Summer Crossing: A Novel

Summer Crossing: A Novel - Truman Capote, Alan U. Schwartz

You likely know already the story behind 'Summer Crossing's rediscovery and posthumous publication, so I'll skip it, but this novella does show off the talent Capote possessed from a very young age.

I haven't read 'Breakfast at Tiffany's yet, but this is a very different style than the calm of 'In Cold Blood' and the rich gothic of 'Other Voices, Other Rooms'.

'Summer Crossing' begins with Grady O'Neill, a disconnected and privileged Manhattan teenager, on the verge of spending a summer by herself in the city while her parents steam to Europe, and her older sister is preoccupied with her own family in Connecticut. She is newly in a love affair, must contend with family pressure to conform, must deal with the world and her friend seeing her as a woman. The book ends with Grady O'Neill, a disconnected and privileged Manhattan teenager, on the verge of thinking about making a very important decision.* Not that no progression was made, or that character progression is essential....The book flies and has wonderful turns of phrase, but while I enjoyed reading it, I can't tack down exactly why I did. Beautiful babble?

*There's a little more down the road than that, but I don't feel like spoiling the scene by detailing it. Even with that ending I don't feel that Grady made any choice in the matter.